SIP Trunk

The SBC: A VoIP Network’s Best Friend

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The Move from TDM to SIP Trunking

SIP TrunkI recently participated in an interesting webinar hosted by NoJitter entitled Real World SIP Trunking Advice: How IT Managers Seize the Opportunity and Avoid the Pitfalls. The webinar focused on the increasingly popular trend to move to SIP Trunking from legacy TDM.  The webinar highlighted research by Forrester which pointed to the fact that while only some 25% of companies have moved over to SIP Trunking so far, the move to SIP Trunking is indeed the future trend and will increase in the coming years.  The move is inevitable as it will save businesses a considerable amount of money, including dramatic reductions in telephony costs by moving to VoIP. And the key ingredient to the success of the move over to SIP trunking is the Session Border Controller (SBC).

The Necessity of an SBC

Theoretically, SIP trunks can connect to the existing IP-PBX without the need for an SBC. However, not using an SBC can lead to a whole array of issues which need to be taken into consideration.  For example, SIP implementation variances can lead to interoperability issues across multivendor systems and service provider networks.  Delivering high voice quality by minimizing packet loss, jitter and latency are also issues that need to be handled. And finally, the vital issue of security must be taken into account as well as SIP trunks are exposed to security threats. Conventional firewalls are not designed to secure VoIP traffic from denial of service attacks or toll fraud.

All of these issues are handled by the basic functionality of the SBC which includes: Security (encompassing such features as providing a VoIP firewall, topology hiding, encryption, and protection from attacks such as denial of service and call fraud); Connectivity (including SIP normalization, NAT Traversal, voice mediation and transcoding, DTMF and Fax conversion); and SLA and Quality of Service. Additionally, the SBC ensures business continuity by minimizing potential service interruption due to call spikes, power outages, service failures, loss of connectivity and natural disasters.

(For more on the role of SBCs, see our previous post by Amir Zmora, Who Needs an SBC Anyway?)

SBCs Handle Unique Challenges Facing Large Enterprises

SBCs are indeed very powerful devices that provide a plethora of services to the enterprise or service provider on whose network they are deployed, and they play a major role in the move to SIP Trunking. This is especially true for large enterprises which have their own unique set of challenges that go beyond the basics, challenges that are also well met by the SBC.

Large enterprises tend to have several major data centers and many geographically dispersed branches. These branches many times have different PBXs, different technologies and different network hardware, and they all need to talk to each other.

These large enterprises will face challenges managing their VoIP networks. Here are some examples:

  • Different branches may be using equipment from different vendors, for example, from Cisco, Avaya, Microsoft Lync and others. Through mergers and acquisitions, large enterprises may have acquired different systems that are now incorporated into the larger network and have to be managed differently.
  • The organization may be going through a migration from one technology to another (moving from TDM to SIP Trunking, for example) but still needs to interoperate with its legacy equipment.
  • The enterprise cannot afford down-time on the network and must ensure the survivability of the network in the case of the loss of WAN connectivity to the Service Provider.
  • IT Administrators would ideally want to see all the alarms monitored on the network in a single location, aggregated and prioritized, rather than have to go out and get them from different systems.
  • Because large enterprises deploy complex networks with a number of SBCs and Gateways, sometimes with different PBXs and IP-PBXs in the various branches, they are faced with complex routing challenges for their VoIP networks.
  • And more…

(For more information on the opportunity of VoIP for small businesses, see our previous post by Itzik Feiglevitch, Small Businesses-Big Opportunity)

 A VoIP Network’s Best Friend

More and more IT administrators are recognizing the power and value of the SBC on their voice networks. In their March 2014 Enterprise Session Border Controllers Quarterly Worldwide and Regional Market Size and Forecasts: 4Q13 focused on the enterprise, Infonetics Research reported that 2013 SBC revenues rose 42% over the previous year and they projected revenues to continue to rise at around 12% annually through 2018. Infonetics states that the primary driver for growth for SBCs is the adoption of SIP trunking services (no surprise), and while most sales are currently in North America (76% of total sales in 2013), other regions are expected to post growth as well, especially in Europe, where the adoption of SIP trunking is accelerating.

Clearly, large enterprises with complex VoIP network deployments face considerable challenges. However, the SBC provides tremendous functionality that can address these challenges well. As the move to SIP Trunking continues to gain momentum, more and more IT Administrators are sure to discover that the SBC is their VoIP network’s best friend.

Image credit: Flickr user Christina Quinn. Modified by AudioCodes under Creative Commons licensing

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