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Image: AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard

Making SBC Configuration Human

When I visited a 777 cockpit for the first time, what struck me most was all the buttons. I thought to myself, how on earth do the pilots know what to do with them all?

Looking at an SBC configuration reminds me of that same experience and over the years I played aroundwith quite a few SBCs of the SBCs out on the market.

Putting things into perspective, a typical SBC user manual is a few hundred pages long. A typical vendor’s beginner SBC course would run three days or more.

In light of this reality, one of the first questions an experienced customer would ask when considering an SBC would be, “just how complex is the SBC to configure?”

The perception of complexity is well rooted in reality and for good reason. It is not that SBC vendors lack UX (User Experience) knowledge or capabilities. The complexity is derived from the flexibility of the different VoIP standards, which means that every vendor can implement the standards in a different way. An advanced SBC is expected to deal with all of this complexity and interwork between different parts of the network on multiple layers, including SIP, media and IP. The SBC needs to be able to classify groups of users according to multiple attributes, to maintain access lists, manage security, routing and more.

Complexity has its price

The implications of SBC complexity are serious. For one, such complexity raises the cost of installation as technicians need to spend more time on site; it increases the chance of misconfiguration resulting in communication errors and increased support costs. Overall, the complexity of an SBC constitutes a hurdle in the transition to SIP trunking.

But does it have to be that complex?

Consider the following:

  • As it does elsewhere, the 80/20 rule holds true for SBCs as well. 80 percent of SBC customers only use 20 percent of the SBC’s configuration options.
  • The variance between similar deployments of different customers is relatively small. By ‘similar deployments’ I refer to a setup which involves certain kinds of PBX (and software releases), a SBC, and a service provider’s SIP trunk service.

The bottom line is that when looking at two different customers that have similar setups, each customer’s configuration will only differ marginally. The difference would usually include IP addresses and other layer 3 to 4 settings, number manipulation rules, authentication passwords and several additional parameters.

Taking the wizard route

A configuration wizard is a well-known user interface concept common in desktops and web applications. The wizard is used to get the user up and running quickly in just a few steps, leaving the advanced application configuration to a later stage using a parameter centric GUI.Image: AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard

The 80/20 rule and the typical similarity between deployments makes the wizard approach a perfect fit for an SBC configuration.

At AudioCodes, we adopted this approach and have developed an SBC configuration wizard application.

Starting with the deployment similarities, we defined “interoperability templates” which in practice is a configuration set which relates to a certain kind of PBX and a service provider’s SIP trunk service. (It can also relate to hosted services and PBX to PBX setups.)

The user configuring the SBC is asked to insert the PBX model, service provider and SBC types into the wizard. After that, all that’s left to do is to provision a few more parameters.

AudioCodes routinely updates its interoperability templates database, which currently comprises over 60 different templates! Every time the SBC wizard is used, it connects to the AudioCodes cloud database and downloads the latest interoperability templates.

After filling in the wizard screens, an SBC configuration file is created. The file can be sent directly to the SBC from the wizard.

In some cases, the configuration will now be complete, leaving the SBC in an operational mode. In other cases, the user would already be able to send calls through the SBC, but would still need to complete the installation by configuring a few additional parameters on the device web GUI.

The end result achieved through using the SBC configuration wizard is a substantial reduction in time and complexity in configuring an AudioCodes SBC. In most cases, it takes no more than five minutes to get initial calls going.

If you, too, have felt “lost in configuration”, where finding the right knob to turn is like finding a needle in a haystack, we would like to hear about your experience and how you navigated through.