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Call recording

My Skype for Business Calls Need to be Recorded, Right?

Call recording

Anyone who calls a customer service or tech support line has gotten that “this call may be recorded for quality assurance purposes” announcement in their lifetime.  That typically means that the contact center you called has a recording system and most likely will record your call, whether it’s to understand how their employees handle customer calls or possibly by law to meet specific compliance purposes.  The expansion of Skype for Business in the enterprise is slowly replacing the traditional phone system and the number of options to record calls is limited to a few companies.  With such a narrow choice of products, why should you record your Skype for Business calls?

The answers are simple.  I’ve outlined a few bullets that will help you decide on whether you should record or not.

Protection – Any verbal transaction that involves your company and a customer or partner should always be recorded.  A recording will protect your company and employees during verbal monetary transactions, no matter how big or how small the transaction is.  Further, in cases where specific laws take place, such as financial investments or order by phone, it is required by law to record the conversation.  More importantly, even if it’s a casual conversation between an employee and customer, the minute a commitment is involved, the conversation should be recorded.  This will help in cases of disputes where the customer or employee may make a claim of “he said, she said”.  Recordings don’t lie, the conversation can simply be played back and the dispute can be settle.  Even in cases where there is no contact center, like in finance for instance, your finance administrator may not speak with customers on a regular basis but at times calls might get escalated to them.  In these situations, wouldn’t it be great to recording the conversation so that there are no discrepancies?  By using Record on Demand, the conversation can be recorded and saved for future reference.

Understanding Your Customer – By recording conversations between your employees and customers, the organization can get a better picture of how it communicates with its customers and how its employees are positioning the company and its products.  Sampling conversations can easily provide a picture of what your customers are looking for, or perhaps outline areas of improvement for your organization.  Sometimes it’s not what the customers says, but rather how the customer says it or implies it.  You can’t get that from your employee.  They can only provide you a recollection of what was said, and in their view only.  Recordings provide an unbiased view of the conversation where management can make informed decisions.

Compliance – Compliance is at the forefront of every conversation in the enterprise.  Many companies have Compliance Officers that manage communications between the firm and its customers.  With the expansion of data breaches, hacking oblog.af technology and identity theft, compliance laws have been implemented over the past few years to protect consumer information such as personal financial information (social security numbers, credit card information, etc.) and even healthcare information from being exposed.  Further, laws such as MAD II (Market Abuse and Market Manipulation) which protects the consumer from misleading or misguided information on financial investment vehicles.  MAD II manages the company’s sales practices and protects the company from disreputable trades.  Other compliance laws such as MIFID II, which is scheduled to be implemented in the European Union in July 2017 stretches the compliance monitoring standard from investment brokers to sales, administrative personnel and certified financial planners.  So, the expansion of compliance is requiring that conversations or basically any communication with the consumer be recorded.  With that requirement, Skype for Business users must have both voice and chat (IM) sessions recorded to protect the consumer and allow the firm to monitor the activity of their employees.

SmartTAP is AudioCodes Skype for Business recording platform.  Built specifically to support Skype for Business, SmartTAP provides a secure, tamper proof environment to record both voice and chat sessions, either consistently, or on a Record on Demand / Save on Demand basis. Through SmartTAP’s Media Server protection, Skype for Business calls are never exposed to the internet, thus adding another layer of protection from outside intrusion.  SmartTAP also stores voice and chat sessions in an encrypted environment, with a Digital Signature added, where original recordings can never be touched.  Expanding SmartTAP throughout the organization is easy by deploying the Skype for Business Toolbar that embeds directly into the Skype for Business client.  Tagging calls, recording calls on demand are made easy by simply selecting the SmartTAP option on the Skype for Business client.  These capabilities only scratch the surface of what SmartTAP can do for your Skype for Business deployment.  Find out more by visiting our website at www.audiocodes.com/smarttap.

SIP based Contact Center

Migrating to a SIP Contact Center

With every year, SIP is becoming more and more common in unified communication solutions in general, and contact center applications in particular, as companies increasingly recognize the benefits that an all-SIP environment can provide. Legacy contact centers have become expensive to maintain and upgrade and harder to integrate with new and high-value applications. Companies with limited in-house resources can especially benefit from SIP which can support a more dispersed work force including home agents or those working from remote locations.

The SIP based contact center allows companies to leverage new capabilities without pouring more resources into management or IT, infrastructure and applications. These capabilities can be deployed quickly, they are easy to deliver to remote agents and as the companies grow, the solutions can grow with them.

SIP based Contact Center

For many organizations, SIP is an integral part of an upgrade, while for others, SIP is part of a telecom cost reduction strategy.

Consider the following migration paths and best practices:

Step 1: Disconnect the PBX from Contact Center trunks

By disconnecting trunks from the PBX, calls can go directly into the contact center, enabling the introduction of new features not supported by the PBX. Data centers can be centralized, routing calls to dispersed contact centers and sending calls to agents that may be company-based, remotely-based or home-based.

Step 2: Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) Migration

Moving to SIP removes some major pain points that have limited contact center efficiency improvements in the past. In particular, it removes the dependency on the PBX. With traditional PBXs, the link between the PBX and the contact center is via a proprietary CTI link. If the CTI link does not support a certain function or does not provide the data necessary for a specific operation, nothing can be done to overcome the limitation. However, in a SIP environment the flexibility is significantly increased because calls can be directed to the contact center application directly.

Step 3: SIP trunking

Consolidation of telephony trunks into SIP trunks saves a considerable amount of money and is far more flexible and scalable. In addition to the estimated cost savings that can be achieved by using VoIP calls, SIP offers the ability to introduce a whole range of additional services to make the customer service operation more effective, ranging from high definition voice to video and more. Contact centers can save considerable expenses by cutting back on toll-free numbers, as VoIP enables click-to-call, which customers can initiate from their PCs or smartphones. Also, with domestic calling being free, VoIP provides another option for agents to make outbound calls to customers, allowing them to be more responsive or even proactive. In terms of enhancing the customer experience, SIP trunking also enables HD audio, providing a high quality call which can be a real differentiator for many companies.

The Key: Seamless Migration

A seamless migration from legacy infrastructures to SIP is key for organizations making the move, many of which are deeply invested in their legacy equipment. In moving to a SIP-based contact center, there is no need for “rip-and-replace” or discarding earlier investments. Customers can choose to convert to this architecture at their own pace and the SIP solution can grow in line with business needs.

Of course, an open architecture like SIP does have some pitfalls: there is no guarantee that two SIP devices will seamlessly operate together out of the box. Basic functions will work but enhanced functions may need to be tested first. AudioCodes provides a complete end-to-end solution consisting of gateways, SBCs, IP phones and other devices that have already been extensively tested and documented in the contact center environment to ensure full functionality out of the box, considerably reducing risk and professional service requirements in a SIP installation.

TCO Reduction

Ultimately, the result of the move to SIP is a significant reduction of TCO.  This is reflected in the considerable savings generated by a reduction of infrastructure costs including the consolidation of telephony trunking and the elimination of separate infrastructure at each location. By virtualizing the resources through the provision of centralized administration, enterprise-wide resources are better put to use, and the company benefits from the flexibility to support multi-channel interactions with customers and a distributed contact center structure which can consist of multiple sites, home agents and hosted services. Additionally, SIP future proofs new media and applications. All this leads to increased agent satisfaction and a better customer experience which also saves costs.

See what AudioCodes has to offer for your Contact Center.

Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

As part of my work with WebRTC, I get a chance to speak to different types of companies about their WebRTC plans. When speaking with companies that have existing VoIP products and services, the conversation usually moves to how WebRTC should be added to their offering, what the additional service benefits are and how to architect the solution. The typical requirement is to leave the existing deployment untouched and bridge WebRTC into the existing network through some sort of a GW. Where should the logical function of the GW be located and what should the network architecture look like are usually the questions debated. To answer them, I decided to write this post.Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

Image credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

To demonstrate the consideration points and options, I will use an example of a contact center. For the sake of this example, let’s take a contact center that has both PSTN lines as well as SIP Trunks from a service provider. All traffic inside the contact center is via SIP where some of the agents are working on premise and others are home agents who are “called in” for handling contact center peak traffic.

 

Architecture Options when Adding WebRTC

In my discussions with customers and partners who are looking to add WebRTC into their existing networks, the architecture alternatives considered were:

  • A dedicated GW
  • Adding a WebRTC interface to their current core server
  • Adding WebRTC through an SBC

Before and After WebRTC

BeforePre WebRTC Contact Center Connectivity

  • Traffic comes from a service provider over SIP trunks or PSTN
  • All traffic in the contact center is SIP
  • Home agents are connected over IP-SIP but this is done in a secured and controlled manner
  • The contact center core server is placed inside the contact center network. Security is handled by other elements so it is protected from denial of service attacks, call fraud and other security vulnerabilities
  • Calls are using G.729 or G.711. Transcoding, if required, is handled in the contact center network

 

After

Adding WebRTC into the game creates new requirements and a new type of traffic source. With WebRTC, users browsing the website of the company serviced by the contact center, can call in directly from the browser. Their traffic runs over the Internet directly to the contact center.

WebRTC includes 2 voice codecs: G.711 and Opus. These are the codecs that come within the browser. If the intention is to eliminate the need for download, calls must be initiated using one of these 2 codecs.

Since G.711 is not built for running over the open Internet as it doesn’t include resiliency, it is beneficial to initiate the calls with Opus. The optimal approach would be to run Opus end-to-end from the browser to the agent but in cases where this is not possible, it is best to keep Opus on the open Internet leg and transcode when getting into the contact center network.Alternatives for adding WebRTC to the Contact Center

  • The contact center is required to have a “leg” in the public Internet domain
  • Quality of service is not managed. Even though in many cases the quality is good, supporting SLA requires the capacity to manage and monitor quality of experience (QoE)
  • Supporting Opus requires either adding a new intensive computing transcoding function or adding Opus to the agent’s client

 

Alternatives Comparison for adding WebRTC to Contact CenterThe comparison above doesn’t relate to any vendor specific product but rather looks at common functionalities of such products. Given this, the following conclusion should be viewed in context of the actual functionality supported by the specific products considered.

The comparison shows that in the case of the contact center example in this post, adding WebRTC to the existing internal contact center server will yield high risk and therefore, it is not a recommended alternative.

The selection between a pure GW and an SBC would depend on priority focus. If security and QoS are of high priority, the comparison leans towards the SBC alternative.