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Cast a spell over your SBCs

We’re Off to See the (SBC) Wizard

Try the magic wand that makes SBC configuration easy

In the Wizard of Oz, Dorothy and her companions found themselves trapped in a strange and unfamiliar land where nothing was as it seemed and everything was vastly more complicated than it needed to be. They embarked on a long search for everyday things that most of us usually take for granted, before finding out at the end of the movie that they had them all along but just didn’t know it.

SBC configuration is complex and time-consuming

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of installing SBCs for your customers, you’ll know that each deployment is different and that each SBC has thousands of possible parameters that need to be configured. The complexity of configuring these SBCs not only takes up a huge chunk of time – you also need well-trained (and therefore highly paid) people to do it.

What if there was another way of configuring SBCs that could cut through all the complexity? A splash of color in the middle of the monochrome monotony of network configuration. Well, now there is.

A simple solution to end complex configuration processes

At AudioCodes, our “Oz moment” was realizing that 80% of all SBC installations only use about 20% of the possible configuration parameters. We also understood that any differences between two installations containing the same PBX and SIP trunk service types tended to be very minor indeed. These two factors showed us where to look for an effective solution.

The AudioCodes Mediant SBC Configuration Wizard was designed with one thing in mind – to make the whole SBC configuration process quick and easy.

Cast a spell over your SBCs

As you’d expect, using the SBC Configuration Wizard is simplicity itself. You start by selecting the required IP-PBX model and SIP trunk service. After that, the Wizard walks you through a handful of straightforward and intuitive configuration screens.

Our templates make everything easy

The SBC Configuration Wizard works with a set of interoperability templates for different IP-PBX models and SIP trunk services. The AudioCodes template database currently contains over 35 IP-PBX models and over 95 SIP trunk services. Brand new and updated templates are routinely created by us and are then stored in the AudioCodes cloud. Whenever you open the Wizard, these templates are automatically available for you to use right away.

Once you’ve finished filling in the Wizard screens, you’ll see a summary of all the configuration details. If you’re happy with everything you’ve done so far, you can go ahead and create a configuration file. You can then send this file directly to the SBC, or you can save it for later if you haven’t yet installed the SBC on site. And that’s it.

Ready to go in less than five minutes

In many cases, the SBC will be fully operational at this point. In other cases, although you will be able to route calls through the SBC, you might also need to configure a few additional parameters on the device’s web GUI.

The AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard is available on the SBC Web GUI and as a standalone Windows application. The SBC Web GUI is ideal for on-site configuration, whereas the Windows application can be used to configure an SBC ahead of time before its actual installation.

The SBC Configuration Wizard has been used by our customers on thousands of installations, and is a tried and tested way of significantly reducing the length of time it takes to configure AudioCodes Mediant Session Border Controllers (SBCs). You can usually expect to have the first calls going through the SBC in less than five minutes.

In addition, the SBC Configuration Wizard can be used to configure AudioCodes media gateways and Multi-Service Business Routers (MSBRs).

Cast a spell over your SBCs

If you’re deploying AudioCodes Mediant Session Border Controllers (SBCs) in a customer’s network, you owe it to yourself to make configuration simple. Try the AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard now and pull back the curtain of complexity. You’ll be glad you did.

Put the Wizard’s magic in your hands today

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Using the SBC Configuration Wizard: An Interview with Michael Williams

[Post is better viewed on the blog Website]

Speaking with customers is always a great way to get feedback. The PM team at AudioCodes does this regularly. Avi Grabinsky who is already well known on the AudioCodes blog was kind enough to invite me to join one such virtual meeting. The result of that meeting is this first customer interview on our blog. The interview is with Michael Williams who is a Technical Consultant for Nexus Open Systems. Nexus is an AudioCodes partner using our SBC Wizard as part of their installation and maintenance process for their customers. It was interesting to hear Michael’s view on this tool.Michael-Williams

Michael, for our readers who are not familiar with Nexus Open Systems, can you tell us what the company is all about?

Nexus Open Systems delivers IT solutions, software, websites and support services to companies and organisations of all sizes that require true technical expertise to meet their goals. Established in 1998, the company has two offices, incorporating a digital media studio and a hi-tech IT Training and Exam Centre, in Exeter the heart of South West England.

We are a networks and technology solutions company working throughout the UK and beyond. 15 years old, we have 75 staff encompassing a team of 40 engineers and developers.

Nexus has been involved with the Microsoft Lync product since its inception and amongst our 18 Microsoft competencies we hold the Gold Communications competency which relates to the Lync product set. This is testament to our ability to consult, install and support Lync solutions. For 2014 our goal is to become a Premier Lync Support Partner and our software development team are developing a Lync application which will go to market in 2015.

We have strategic relationships with key vendors within the Lync Ecosystem including: Microsoft, AudioCodes (Silver Partner), Mitel (Gold Partner), Dell (Premier Partner), VMware (Enterprise Solutions Partner) and Jabra (Gold Partner).

In the segment of Microsoft Lync who are your prime customers and what segments do you cater for?

Nexus works primarily with medium to large enterprise clients with regards to Lync, with on-premise deployments making up the majority of our current projects.

We are not confined to any organisation segments and work across all verticals, including professional services, public sector, education, non-profit and general industries.

Where do you see  AudioCodes products playing a role in Lync environments?

AudioCodes form a core part of our Lync environment offerings, both in terms of gateways and also handsets. We build our solutions primarily around the AudioCodes product set and then bring in other elements from the Lync ecosystem.

You have been an early adopter of the AudioCodes SBC Wizard. What did you find as the key benefits of this tool and how was life before it?

The SBC Wizard helps us reduce the amount of time needed to setup an SBC: as the wizard applies the most common settings, it saves around an hour and a half per SBC.

Before the SBC Wizard we would have to configure all the basic settings that are needed manually. This can be very tedious and time-consuming.  Moreover, previously when we did the configuration manually there were configuration errors. If we were lucky, those errors were discovered on the spot as part of the configuration process and then we had to spend some time figuring out the errors and fixing them. In the harder cases, errors were discovered after deployment when users were already using the network and some scenarios weren’t running well. Such cases are more of a problem because they involve bad customer experience. Therefore, using the wizard not only saves us time but helps us improve our customers’ experience.

You have several Unified Communications partners. How do you handle cases of multi-vendor sites and do you use AudioCodes products to support these environments?

Our engineers have the expertise to be able to integrate Lync together with AudioCodes devices within multi-vendor sites. Microsoft Lync and AudioCodes are our prime focus for Unified Communications; alternative solutions play a much smaller role in this part of our portfolio.

What do you see as the future direction and growth areas for Nexus?

Nexus is increasingly moving into the large business and enterprise sector. With regard to voice, we are currently developing this segment of the market and are driving it through a direct and reseller channel pre-sales and consultancy regarding Microsoft Lync and AudioCodes gateways.

I think the technology that will have the biggest impact in the communications market will be SIP trunks. They allow our customers to reduce costs and improve disaster recovery options.

If you are interested in sharing your experience with AudioCodes products in an interview on this blog please send me a note.

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Who Needs an SBC Anyway?

[Post is better viewed on the blog Website]

In the early days of SIP, I was working on VoIP protocol stacks at Radvision. As part my role there I used to attend many of the IETF meetings and SIPit interoperability events. The standards where the holy grail and we were a bit naïve in assuming that everyone would be implementing the standard and nothing but the standard…and networks and products would interconnect easily.

The SBCs Come to life

In those days, almost 15 years ago, new startups that focused on something they called a Session Border Controller (SBC) were coming to life. Later down the road of VoIP deployment, more established companies adopted this concept.

I remember a panel at one of the VON shows in which I came out against this trend. At the end of the day, I said, every single SBC function is handled by the standards. As long as the VoIP community will follow the standards, life will be good and simple.

Reality check

I guess it is needless to say that the world of VoIP is more complex than simply implementing the standard. The reality is that networks and products usually don’t interwork without a special effort to make this interworking possible. There are 2 fundamental reasons for this:

  • Standards are complex, very detailed with multiple options, and many times companies interpret them differently
  • Companies want to add their special secret sauce into their products and sometimes, due to technical or commercial reasons, they implement some of the functionalities in a proprietary manner

Regardless of the reasons this is the reality. The naïve position of the past didn’t pass the reality check of real life.

Who-needs-an-SBC-Anyway

The business communications angle

VoIP is deployed in many enterprises and service providers’ networks, yet there are still many enterprises and SMBs that are not connected to VoIP services. Taking a closer look at those already using VoIP in the enterprise or receiving such a service from their service providers, we see several common characteristics:

  • Not all branches use the same PBX. This is due to acquisitions or changes along the life of the network that were not implemented across the board
  • A hosted service was added servicing some of the branches, requiring the connecting of the on-premise PBX and phones with the hosted service network
  • A unified communications service such as Microsoft Lync was added in addition to the existing telephony system requiring the connection of the 2 networks together
  • Survivability needs and local PSTN termination require an on-premise “box” to provide these capabilities

Each one of the points above introduces complexity and a mix of standard and proprietary (or as some vendors call it, “SIP like” or “in the spirit of SIP”). As this phenomenon is the reality of today’s business networks, a smart mediation box is required to connect between the different elements and support these requirements.

What is special about the SBC that makes it the “Swiss Army Knife” of VoIP?

An SBC is like a Swiss Army Knife as it handles many functions. It is well aware of the specific environment in which it is deployed and typically has a flexible configuration that allows adapting it to the specific deployment environment. On the other hand, SBCs are also known for complex configuration due to their complex functionality. As such, a configuration wizard that contains various vendor product profiles for automatic and easy configuration of the SBC for specific deployment scenarios comes in handy for simplifying SBC configuration.  

A typical SBC would have the following functions:

Mitigation & connectivity – connect between different PBXs and different hosted services, connectivity with different SIP trunk providers.

Security – detect security threats such as denial of service, call theft and eavesdropping and protect the network from them. The SBC may also perform encryption/decryption functions to force a policy requiring all outbound traffic to be encrypted.

Quality of Service – the SBC monitors call quality, reports on issues and may enhance quality through media manipulation

Routing & policy enforcement– making sure calls routed based on the enterprise policy-based on user identity & privileges, call termination cost, quality requirements and network conditions

Regulatory compliance – route calls to recording services

The list of functions above is a general and non-exhaustive list. Naturally, there are different functionalities required depending on the type of the SBC, be it an access SBC or an enterprise SBC.

In conclusion, if in the past there was a debate about the need for an SBC, today SBCs are found in most deployments, on-premise as well as in hosted services, providing functionalities such as security and resiliency. Moreover, the SBC is included in many of the architectures defined in the standards.

Image credit: Flickr user Hiking Artist

 

Image: AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard

Making SBC Configuration Human

When I visited a 777 cockpit for the first time, what struck me most was all the buttons. I thought to myself, how on earth do the pilots know what to do with them all?

Looking at an SBC configuration reminds me of that same experience and over the years I played aroundwith quite a few SBCs of the SBCs out on the market.

Putting things into perspective, a typical SBC user manual is a few hundred pages long. A typical vendor’s beginner SBC course would run three days or more.

In light of this reality, one of the first questions an experienced customer would ask when considering an SBC would be, “just how complex is the SBC to configure?”

The perception of complexity is well rooted in reality and for good reason. It is not that SBC vendors lack UX (User Experience) knowledge or capabilities. The complexity is derived from the flexibility of the different VoIP standards, which means that every vendor can implement the standards in a different way. An advanced SBC is expected to deal with all of this complexity and interwork between different parts of the network on multiple layers, including SIP, media and IP. The SBC needs to be able to classify groups of users according to multiple attributes, to maintain access lists, manage security, routing and more.

Complexity has its price

The implications of SBC complexity are serious. For one, such complexity raises the cost of installation as technicians need to spend more time on site; it increases the chance of misconfiguration resulting in communication errors and increased support costs. Overall, the complexity of an SBC constitutes a hurdle in the transition to SIP trunking.

But does it have to be that complex?

Consider the following:

  • As it does elsewhere, the 80/20 rule holds true for SBCs as well. 80 percent of SBC customers only use 20 percent of the SBC’s configuration options.
  • The variance between similar deployments of different customers is relatively small. By ‘similar deployments’ I refer to a setup which involves certain kinds of PBX (and software releases), a SBC, and a service provider’s SIP trunk service.

The bottom line is that when looking at two different customers that have similar setups, each customer’s configuration will only differ marginally. The difference would usually include IP addresses and other layer 3 to 4 settings, number manipulation rules, authentication passwords and several additional parameters.

Taking the wizard route

A configuration wizard is a well-known user interface concept common in desktops and web applications. The wizard is used to get the user up and running quickly in just a few steps, leaving the advanced application configuration to a later stage using a parameter centric GUI.Image: AudioCodes SBC Configuration Wizard

The 80/20 rule and the typical similarity between deployments makes the wizard approach a perfect fit for an SBC configuration.

At AudioCodes, we adopted this approach and have developed an SBC configuration wizard application.

Starting with the deployment similarities, we defined “interoperability templates” which in practice is a configuration set which relates to a certain kind of PBX and a service provider’s SIP trunk service. (It can also relate to hosted services and PBX to PBX setups.)

The user configuring the SBC is asked to insert the PBX model, service provider and SBC types into the wizard. After that, all that’s left to do is to provision a few more parameters.

AudioCodes routinely updates its interoperability templates database, which currently comprises over 60 different templates! Every time the SBC wizard is used, it connects to the AudioCodes cloud database and downloads the latest interoperability templates.

After filling in the wizard screens, an SBC configuration file is created. The file can be sent directly to the SBC from the wizard.

In some cases, the configuration will now be complete, leaving the SBC in an operational mode. In other cases, the user would already be able to send calls through the SBC, but would still need to complete the installation by configuring a few additional parameters on the device web GUI.

The end result achieved through using the SBC configuration wizard is a substantial reduction in time and complexity in configuring an AudioCodes SBC. In most cases, it takes no more than five minutes to get initial calls going.

If you, too, have felt “lost in configuration”, where finding the right knob to turn is like finding a needle in a haystack, we would like to hear about your experience and how you navigated through.