Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

As part of my work with WebRTC, I get a chance to speak to different types of companies about their WebRTC plans. When speaking with companies that have existing VoIP products and services, the conversation usually moves to how WebRTC should be added to their offering, what the additional service benefits are and how to architect the solution. The typical requirement is to leave the existing deployment untouched and bridge WebRTC into the existing network through some sort of a GW. Where should the logical function of the GW be located and what should the network architecture look like are usually the questions debated. To answer them, I decided to write this post.Moving WebRTC Into Your Network Through the Front Door

Image credit: Muhammad Mahdi Karim

To demonstrate the consideration points and options, I will use an example of a contact center. For the sake of this example, let’s take a contact center that has both PSTN lines as well as SIP Trunks from a service provider. All traffic inside the contact center is via SIP where some of the agents are working on premise and others are home agents who are “called in” for handling contact center peak traffic.

 

Architecture Options when Adding WebRTC

In my discussions with customers and partners who are looking to add WebRTC into their existing networks, the architecture alternatives considered were:

  • A dedicated GW
  • Adding a WebRTC interface to their current core server
  • Adding WebRTC through an SBC

Before and After WebRTC

BeforePre WebRTC Contact Center Connectivity

  • Traffic comes from a service provider over SIP trunks or PSTN
  • All traffic in the contact center is SIP
  • Home agents are connected over IP-SIP but this is done in a secured and controlled manner
  • The contact center core server is placed inside the contact center network. Security is handled by other elements so it is protected from denial of service attacks, call fraud and other security vulnerabilities
  • Calls are using G.729 or G.711. Transcoding, if required, is handled in the contact center network

 

After

Adding WebRTC into the game creates new requirements and a new type of traffic source. With WebRTC, users browsing the website of the company serviced by the contact center, can call in directly from the browser. Their traffic runs over the Internet directly to the contact center.

WebRTC includes 2 voice codecs: G.711 and Opus. These are the codecs that come within the browser. If the intention is to eliminate the need for download, calls must be initiated using one of these 2 codecs.

Since G.711 is not built for running over the open Internet as it doesn’t include resiliency, it is beneficial to initiate the calls with Opus. The optimal approach would be to run Opus end-to-end from the browser to the agent but in cases where this is not possible, it is best to keep Opus on the open Internet leg and transcode when getting into the contact center network.Alternatives for adding WebRTC to the Contact Center

  • The contact center is required to have a “leg” in the public Internet domain
  • Quality of service is not managed. Even though in many cases the quality is good, supporting SLA requires the capacity to manage and monitor quality of experience (QoE)
  • Supporting Opus requires either adding a new intensive computing transcoding function or adding Opus to the agent’s client

 

Alternatives Comparison for adding WebRTC to Contact CenterThe comparison above doesn’t relate to any vendor specific product but rather looks at common functionalities of such products. Given this, the following conclusion should be viewed in context of the actual functionality supported by the specific products considered.

The comparison shows that in the case of the contact center example in this post, adding WebRTC to the existing internal contact center server will yield high risk and therefore, it is not a recommended alternative.

The selection between a pure GW and an SBC would depend on priority focus. If security and QoS are of high priority, the comparison leans towards the SBC alternative.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Captcha * Time limit exceeded. Please complete the captcha once again.