The Value of Voice

Make it Short, it is Expensive

Determining the value of communications

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Mothers-in-law are a sensitive subject. Anyone who has a mother-in law knows this very well.

Now, don’t get me wrong. Most people would probably envy me for mine. She got into this post because she is a natural reserve for technology of the 60-70’s. She made a conscious decision to remain planted back in those days in many areas, technology is just one of them. It’s a long story and this isn’t the best place to go into details about it J. Last week I was in Spain with my wife trekking in the Pyrenees and our kids were left with our extended family. Two days during the week were with my mother-in-law at our house. When I called and my 6 years old son picked up the phone he started waffling his usual nonsense. In the background I heard my mother-in-law saying to him – “make it short, this is a very expensive call”.

The value of voice goes down to zero

This is something I heard many years ago and one I use myself. But this statement needs to be placed in the right context. When I call from my vacation, I have many means of making a free call or a call that is so cheap that practically puts it into the “free” category. My son can waffle for as long as he wants. I can call through a mobile application (called Bphone) provided by my local service provider that takes my home number with me and allows me to make calls from anywhere over WiFi at the cost of a local call, as if I was calling from home. This happens to be an application AudioCodes has provided Bezeq (the local service provider) for this service. I have plenty of other options for calling PSTN using Viber, Skype… or the AudioCodes enterprise mobility application. All these allow for calls from anywhere for a free/flat rate to a very low cost.

But this doesn’t mean that the value of voice goes down to zero. Voice is still the #1 revenue source for service providers. It has value for consumers and surely has value for enterprises, value that is far more than the call itself. There are services attached to calls in the enterprise environment.

A good post written by Yossi Zadah is scheduled for release next Monday that takes a look at the value of voice calls through the prism of call toll fraud, so stay tuned.

The value of communication is determined by the service in which it is embedded

The Value of VoiceThe value of voice as well as video, presence and messaging, is not in simply connecting such sessions but needs to be viewed in the context of the service in which it is embedded. If voice/video communication is embedded in an insurance company’s self-service website where a user can speak with an agent when running into issues purchasing his insurance, the value of the call is not the amount of cents it costs but rather the fact that the deal was closed instead of the customer going to the competitor. There is a multitude of examples of similar and other cases such as remote learning and group collaboration. In all these cases, the value of the call is the cost saved or the revenue earned. The value perceived by the provider of this specific service is higher than the value the Communications Service Provider (CSP) receives for the call. Therefore, packaging the calling service in a way that is easy to embed into other services will allow the communications service provider to extract more value from it. This naturally leads us to the web and to WebRTC.

WebRTC as a catalyzer

WebRTC makes communications ubiquitous across web services. It renders the world of VoIP communications accessible to web developers and not only to VoIP experts. WebRTC is a catalyzer for communication revenue as it allows combining communications with web services. Moreover, it allows connecting these services with the existing enterprise communications platforms through SBCs that reside within the enterprise domain or in the cloud. With WebRTC, communications become a web feature that allows for the increase of conversion rates and revenue from web-based services and therefore, its true value becomes the value of the service and not of the call itself.

Returning to the phrase “The value of voice goes down to zero” I would coin a new phrase “The value of voice is equal to the value of the service in which it resides.

What is your view on the value of voice? Feel free to express your views and comment to this post.

1 reply
  1. Luis Borges Quina says:

    To make it short I would say: Great post Amir ! If you allow me (as I always use Tsahi’s quotes in my Powerpoints) I will now also use your under © : “The value of voice is equal to the value of the service in which it resides.” I fully agree and at the London WebRT Global Summit we presented “Contextual Advertising with WebRTC”. Hope to see you soon on the WebRTC galaxy 🙂

    Reply

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