all you need is cloud

All You Need is Cloud

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all you need is cloudI recently read the post from Software Advice called 3 Ways to Keep Your VoIP Service From Going Down With the Internet by Don Sadler. Overall it, was music to my ears, hence the title of this post.

Many people fall in love with the concept that going cloud with your enterprise telephony system means the end of all of your telephony worries.

The reality is more complicated, however.

Don’t get me wrong, putting your enterprise communications in the cloud is the right way to go. Yet life is a bit more complex than pure cloud vs. pure on-premise. The grey area between them is what complicates things.

The misconception of pure cloud

Starting to use an enterprise communications cloud service would basically require the following steps:

  • Register for the service and pay with your credit card
  • Upload an Excel file with all users and extensions
  • Start talking

This would pretty much be all that is required for a greenfield, a one location business with a few guys that are using an application on their mobile phones for their business telephony operations. But what if you are an enterprise, large or SMB, with multiple locations and an existing telephony system?

In such a case there will be a few requirements that will complicate things. A non-exhaustive list of these requirements include:

  • Gradual migration to the cloud
  • Call flow optimization (e.g. when 2 users are calling in the same premise)
  • Cost optimization when calling to PSTN
  • Resiliency

Gradual migration to the cloud

Typically, IT will not pull the plug on the current on-premise system and plug in the cloud service instead. They would run a test on one site, then expand to a multi-site pilot and only after a few months make the switch. What happens during this pilot phase and how are the 2 systems connected?

Moreover, in some deployments, IT may decide to maintain the old system for a longer period.  This may be due to technical or business reasons. Supporting this requirement will typically be achieved by deploying an on-premise SBC that will connect the 2 networks and make this integration transparent to the end user.

Call flow optimization

In the pure cloud approach, when all you have on-premise are IP Phones or an application on your smartphone, for example a phone call from John to his colleague next door, Alice, would see the signaling going through the cloud.

How about the media?

Would it go directly between John and Alice or would it need to go all the way to the cloud provider and back?

The answer is… it depends.

There are various factors that will determine the media flow in such a case. The key requirement for the cloud provider to technically be able to enable direct media is to know John and Alice are located on the same network. This can be achieved by simply having one “leg” of the cloud SBC in the enterprise network, something that introduces a security vulnerability or through an on-premise “component” that will figure this out. In real world deployments, all of these options exist.

Cost optimization when calling to PSTN

Do you want all calls to the PSTN to go out from the cloud provider’s network or perhaps you have better PSTN termination agreements in some areas where you also have a local branch? Would you want to route calls to the PSTN in that calling area through your local branch?

Achieving this will require some extra routing logic and an on-premise GW in the branch office.

Resiliency

This brings us back to Don Sadler’s post that talks about resiliency requirements for hosted communication services. Resiliency will keep communications alive even if the cloud provider’s service goes down or if there is a problem with the company’s connection to the provider. Having an on-premise cloud appliance will ensure continuity of communications between extensions in the branch, calls to the PSTN and routing of calls through a backup Internet connection (e.g. cellular).

Enterprise Hosted Services Architecture

A typical hosted enterprise communication services architecture

Conclusion

If you are in process of architecting your move to the cloud, it is important to remember that as VoIP cloud deployments move from MPLS to non-dedicated lines over the Internet, the level of control in the hands of your cloud provider is reduced. As such, having an on-premise demarcation point becomes essential. Solutions that enhance cloud communication services are available on the market. Audiocodes, as part of its One Voice for Hosted Services, offers such solutions specifically for Broadsoft deployments as well as for other hosted VoIP and UC deployments.

Featured image credit: Paula Izzo
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  1. […] in March, I wrote about enterprises moving their VoIP communication systems to the cloud and why it is more complex than simply putting a credit card number on a website. In that post, I […]

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