1 Answer to WebRTC Signaling

1 Answer to WebRTC Signaling

[Post is better viewed on the blog Website]

A lot of opinionated information has been written about the debated topic of WebRTC signaling. An example of a good and well-balanced technical post is WebRTC Hacks, written by Victor Pascual.

I am excited to be participating in a panel on this topic next week at WebRTC Global Summit in London and I thought it would be a good idea to provide some points about this topic beforehand. If you happen to be around please come and pay us a visit, we are at booth #6.

What is the debate about?

There are 2 fundamental items the industry is debating about:

  • Should WebRTC define signaling
  • When building a product/service should signaling be based on existing standard or proprietary protocols

The answer to the first question is easy. Since WebRTC was born to serve Web developers, not Telecom VoIP geeks, one would never be able to imagine what WebRTC could be used for. This fact requires taking the “less is more” approach and define only the minimal must, thus, leave signaling out of the WebRTC definition scope and put it in the hands of those building each specific solution.

The second question seems more complex as is testimony to the many opinions out there. Some think proprietary JSON-based signaling is the only answer. Others think standard signaling is the answer pitching to go for SIP or XMPP. Another opinion I enjoyed debating about at the WebRTC 2013 conference in Paris was that WebRTC was “born” for IMS (needless to say I didn’t support that point of view).

1 Answer to WebRTC Signaling

So what is the 1 answer for WebRTC signaling?

If it wasn’t clear to this point, the answer is simply – it depends.

The decision of what signaling to use when building a product or a service depends on its nature and the solution for which it was designed for.

The primary distinction required for deciding if a standard or proprietary approach fits best is whether the solution goes into a service island or if it needs to connect with an existing VoIP network.

In the case of a service island, proprietary signaling will typically be chosen because it is the easy approach, however, if advanced telephony functions, already well defined in standard protocols such as SIP are required, there is no point in reinventing the wheel. It is perfectly OK to pick and choose the functionalities of SIP needed in the implementation and ignore the rest.

On the other hand, if the solution is about allowing WebRTC service to connect with existing standard VoIP networks such as SIP the natural signaling choice would be SIP.

Last but not least, if you are providing an end-to-end solution that includes the WebRTC clients as well as the server, whatever signaling is hidden under the hood doesn’t really interest the developer building the application. What does interest the developer is how simple it is to use your APIs for integrating your client into his product.

It would be interesting to get your comments to this post detailing your view on this subject and how you decided to deal with this matter in your implementation.

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